Joe’s Special Box – Volume 59

Joden Girl

Baubles, Bling, and A Collector’s Things

I can’t resist a piece that tells a story.  I’m not sure how this tale began…  perhaps with “Once upon a time” or maybe even “Long ago”.  There’s no way to be sure.  What I do know is how it ended…  “LLewellin died March 30th, 1874.”  These words are hand engraved on the outside of this Victorian mourning ring.

But LLewellin was only half of the story.  Inside the ring are the words “Martha Warriner Megler died.  August 21, 1867.” 

As for the beginning and middle of this romantic saga, I can only imagine.  Perhaps it was a long and happy marriage or perhaps they were star-crossed lovers.  Maybe Llewellin and Martha had children and one of them comissioned the making of this memento… a 15 karat rosy gold English ring set with an oval banded agate.  This stone is nestled in a textured halo of vertical raised lines while a pair of enameled flowers adorn the shoulders of the piece.  The inside of this ring is silky smooth – it’s a comfort, both to wear and remember.  I miss the old traditions, like mourning jewelry.  After you’re gone, what story will your jewelry tell?  Visit us at Joden where our pieces are the heirlooms of your future.  

“You can go to a museum and look, or come to us and touch.”

Written by Carrie Martin

Photos by Dana Jerpe

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Joe’s Special Box – Volume 57

Joden Girl

Baubles, Bling, and A Collector’s Things

When you visit our showroom, often times you will be treated to a tour of the store…  it’s a visual feast for the eyes.  From pre-owned Rolex watches to fine Art Deco jewels, there is something for everyone.  Perhaps one of the most popular stops on the tour is the Victorian case featuring a vast array of late 19th century mourning jewelry.  Based on the broad range of reactions to some of the pieces available, we’ve dubbed it “creepy and cool”.  

This beauty from Joe’s Special Box would definitely fall into the cool category, not to mention beautiful.  Entirely constructed from 14 karat yellow gold, this elegant bangle is as lovely as it is wearable.  Winking from the center of the fluted buttercup setting is a .20 carat diamond.  It adds a hint of sparkle to an otherwise somber piece.  Sloping down from both sides of the center are black enameled shoulders artfully accented by a pattern of alternating diamond and clover shapes.  Don’t let the delicate appearance of this Victorian beauty fool you, it’s actually quite sturdy and able to be worn every day.  Make it yours for just $1,350.00.

“You can go to a museum and look, or come to us and touch.”

Written by Carrie Martin

Photos by Dana Jerpe

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Windows to the Soul

Joden Girl

Baubles, Bling, and Lover’s Things

Called a lover’s eye, or an eye miniature, these are some of the rarest and highly collectible pieces of antique jewelry. Just as their name states, they are tiny watercolor paintings (most often done on ivory) of an eye… and nothing else.  The painting is usually surrounded by a decorative frame and covered with a piece of protective glass.  You may be wondering, “Why just an eye?”

Sources say that the eye belonged to a loved one, usually a forbidden love.  It was believed that if the painting only featured an eye, it would be nearly impossible to identify who is depicted.  Because in the case of a clandestine affair, anonymity is everything.  Only the person wearing the piece would know the secret identity.  Very romantic…

Most lover’s eyes were made from the late 1700’s to the early 1800’s.  Experts believe that fewer than 1000 of them are still in existence.  Here at Joden, we have three.  The one pictured above has already been purchased by a private collector, these two are available now. 

 

Near the end of the 1800’s, Queen Victoria revived the lover’s eye.  However, Victoria had them created of all of her loved ones:  her children, family, and friends.  Often, they became mourning jewelry, as many of them featured a hair receiver on the back.  The use of pearls often symbolized tears.  What a beautiful treasure!

 

Come to Joden to see these incredible love tokens,  and remember…

“You can go to a museum and look, or you can come to Joden and touch.”

Written by Carrie Martin

Photos by Shelly Isacco

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