Pick of the Week – Volume 31

Joden Girl

Baubles and Bling with Unbelievable Pricing

A tiny miniature painting…  what could be more endearing?  Or perhaps more scandalous!  In the late 18th century, these small depictions also known as lover’s eyes began popping up in Britain.  Sometimes these gems featured the eye of a child or family member…  however, sometimes the eye belonged to a forbidden lover!  

Lover’s eyes centered on a small painting of an eye, and perhaps an eyebrow…  but nothing more.  This was to keep the identity of the person secret.  Many of these pieces were surrounded by a halo of natural pearls or sparkling gemstones.  This incredibly intimate jewel brought to life the intense gaze of adoration.  Often, a look can convey so much more than words could ever say.  

These treasures are rare – it is believed that fewer than 1000 of them remain.  Many of these unusual pieces are brooches…  allowing them to be pinned and worn close to the heart.  This particular one is a pin and a pendant; it showcases a blue iris with a strong arched brow.  Twenty-six faceted black onyx stones surround the eye.

A hair receiver on the back of the piece is filled with an entwined lock of brown hair.  These two details – the black stones and the hair receiver – make me wonder if perhaps this lover’s eye is an early piece of mourning jewelry.  The pendant is accompanied by a yellow gold y-chain.  Once it is clasped around the neck, the piece itself rests lower on the neck, allowing it to be concealed underneath clothing should you so desire.

This unique gem has been a part of our inventory for more than a year.  Originally, it was on our site for $5,000.00.  We are now offering it as a Pick of the Week – which means it will be available with new and unbelievable pricing.  Now – this rare bit of history can be yours for just $2,500.00!

If you’re a collector of distinct finds, this lover’s eye is the piece for you.  Click the link to make it yours today.

“You can go to a museum and look, or come to us and touch.”

Written by Carrie Martin

Photos by Dana Jerpe and Shelly Isacco

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