Conversion Diversion

Joden Girl

Baubles, Bling, and Recreated Things

My mother’s jewelry box was always a mystery to me as a child.  I can see it in my mind so clearly…  a hinged lid that when opened, revealed two drawers of little square compartments overflowing with assorted trinkets and treasures.  I loved digging down into the layers, pulling out my favorite pieces…  a silver charm bracelet with mechanical charms (a tiny rotary telephone with a moving dial, a baby buggy with spinning wheels), a matching earring and necklace set comprised of a series of small wooden beads, and a Retro style ring with a synthetic ruby center.  Piece after piece, each one more intriguing than the next to my six-year-old eyes.  The box always sat on my mother’s dresser, neatly centered in front of the oversize mirror.  Unfortunately, she never wore the pieces inside. 

I know this resonates with many of you.  We all have those pieces that seem to float around the bottom of our jewelry box – getting pushed aside time and again as we sift through  searching for our favorites.  For many of us, the items that don’t get worn are pins…  circle pins, lapel pins, lingerie pins, and stick pins. 

At Joden, we have drawers full of stick pins…  hundreds of them.  We have enameled flowers, seed pearl accented love knots, hearts, and clovers, there are animals of every kind, sparkling gemstones, both silver and gold.  Stick pins are a great accessory and still look good threaded through a scarf or necktie – but if you’re just not a pin girl, here are some charming options. 

 

The photo on the left shows a sampling of former stick pins that have been converted to tiny charms.  The photo on the right showcases one of them on a delicate gold chain.  It’s a perfect pendant; able to be worn every day.  It’s a signature piece that can be worn alone or layered with another necklace or two. 

 

Maybe you have more than one stick pin, or perhaps you would like to start collecting them.  The bracelet on the left is a progression of cabochon gemstone charms- moonstone, amethyst, turquoise, jade, and opal.  The theme of the bracelet on the right is diamond trim – while each charm is uniquely different, the diamond accents bring it all together. 

Whether you have pins of your own or perhaps you need to check out the selection available at Joden, it’s all about conversion – giving new life to an old treasure.

“Go to our site and look, then come to Joden and touch.”

Written by Carrie Martin

Photos by Shelly Isacco

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In Loving Memory

Joden Girl

Baubles, Bling and Mourning Rings

Snapchat, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter… 

Duck Face, Kissy Face, Smize, or Squnich…

Millenials are memorializing every detail of their lives, from the most mundane to the downright inappropriate – it’s all there on social media for the world to see.  I’m not averse to it…  I’ve been known to pose for a selfie or two, send out snaps and check in with my girls on Facebook – but some life events deserve more than a quick pic and a hasty status update.  Things like engagements and weddings, or perhaps when a new life begins, and certainly when a life ends. 

They were doing it right two hundred years ago.  When a loved one passed away, the bereavement process often included the creation of a special piece of jewelry; it was called mourning jewelry.  These unique treasures usually included the name of the deceased person as well as their death date.  Many also included a special compartment for a lock of hair.  These small trinkets were handed out at the funeral while more elaborate styles were worn by family members. 

These are just three of the mourning rings we have here at Joden.  Black enamel was a recurring theme in this type of jewelry (as you can see) as were pearls, urns, and flowers.  Each one of these rings is engraved (from left to right)…

  • T.T.J.  14.12.1893
  • M.H.C. Mourant died 6th Oct. 1866
  • W:  Terry OB: 24 Oct: 1809: AE 53

    

The trio of rings on the left are all very similar to each other; the hair receiver on top surrounded by natural pearls (usually signifying the loss of a child).  Only one of them actually contains hair – the other two are still waiting for someone to fill them.  The ring on the right was made in the Georgian period.  The delicate blonde tresses inside have been plaited into a basket-weave pattern completely surrounded by sparkling purple gemstones. 

    

Quite a lot of the mementos made in the 1800’s were brooches and lockets, like the ones shown here.  The two pins in the foreground are exceptional examples of the fine workmanship that mourning jewelry is known for.  The locket in the background is covered in a layer of black enamel with a pearl-centered flower on the front.  As you can see in the photo on the right, the locket appears to have never been used…  the original blue silk is still inside in pristine condition.

I readily admit that when one of my sons is doing something particularly adorable or noteworthy, the first thing I reach for is my cell phone – to capture that smile forever.  Photographs are truly worth a thousand words, and I cherish all of mine.  But I can’t help but feel that if I had a ring on my little finger (with a lock of my loved one’s hair safely cradled inside), it would be incredibly comforting to know that I carried a part of them with me every day.  I’m certain that each time I looked at the ring, I would smile.  And remember. 

Written by Carrie Martin

Photos by Shelly Isacco

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Driving Miss Daisy

Joden Girl

Baubles, Bling, and Flowery Things

Currently my life is a re-enactment of “Driving Miss Daisy”.  I, of course, am the star of the show, Miss Daisy.  The role of Hoke (Miss Daisy’s driver) is being played by a myriad of different actors – basically anyone I can get to take me where I need to go.  I had surgery in December resulting in a cast on my left leg that prohibits me from driving.  So…  here I am.  Miss Daisy.

Earlier this week, I shared a daisy ring with you.  Daisies are my favorite flower.  They’re so happy!  I absolutely have to share this daisy pendant with you.

This pendant was included in my “Twelve Gifts of Christmas” series.  I am shocked that we still have this little gem.  It’s made by “Tiffany & Co”.  Constructed from 18 karat rose gold, it features five pear-shaped lavender amethysts and one tiny round diamond center.  Although it has been retired, it is still available at select Tiffany & Co. stores for $1550.00.  Not a bad price for a Tiffany piece. 

     

Two reasons why I can’t believe this piece is still here…  First, it’s adorable.  Rose gold is hugely popular and this is a perfect way to add a bit of it to your jewelry wardrobe.  Here’s the second reason.  Brace yourself.  We have this pendant priced at just $750.00!  Less than half of the original price at Tiffany & Co.  It’s a steal!  Make it yours today.

Go to our site and look, then come to Joden –  where everything is coming up daisies!

Written by Carrie Martin

Photos by Shelly Isacco

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