Joe’s Special Box – Volume 12

Joden Girl

Baubles, Bling, and A Collector’s Things

Sometimes Joe’s treasures don’t make it to the “special box”.  Trinkets are stashed in a tiny wooden cabinet that sits on a shelf, curios and doodads are piled on ledges, and occasionally jewels are hidden in a desk drawer.  This bracelet is just one example of that…  and honestly, I didn’t really know what was so unique or special about it.

Then one day, I was doing some online research – Google is my friend.  I stumbled across a near twin to our bangle as well as several other similar pieces.  This bracelet is quite rare – an example of American Gypsy Jewelry.  

It features all the classic earmarks of Gypsy adornments…  the profile of a beautiful woman, raised star-like flowers, a bright synthetic gemstone, and a horseshoe.  Be sure to wear it with the ends of the shoe facing up… You don’t want your luck to run out!  It has a clear hallmark inside “14K” – most jewelry of this type is constructed from 14 karat gold – although it’s value far exceeds the gold weight.  Solid and sturdy – this is one piece of American history to be worn and enjoyed.

“You can go to a museum and look, or you can come to Joden and touch.”

Written by Carrie Martin

Photos by Shelly Isacco

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The Ties That Bind

Joden Girl

Baubles and Bling – It’s a family thing!

These bright and colorful earrings are an integral part of a suite of jewelry recently acquired at Joden.  Like many parures, it is comprised of multiple pieces that can be disassembled and then reconfigured to create different looks.  

The collection is ensconced in the original fitted leather case…  with the jewelers name carefully inscribed on the ivory satin lining.

Krausz Testverek – or Krausz Siblings – a jewelry store located in Budapest in the late 1800’s into the early 1900’s.  Like Joden, it was a family owned business and according to these lovely examples of advertising – they too specialized in antique jewelry.

Five individual components (a necklet, a brooch, a pair of earrings, a small drop pendant, and a connecting segment) are elaborately set with a multitude of color.  Foiled settings bring life to the square cut emeralds and peridot.  These gems are evenly spaced by lavish pops of pink tourmaline and white pearls.  Further enhancing the design is an intricate pattern of black, white, and blue enamel. 

 

Here you can see each individual piece and then the necklace fully united.  So many possibilities – check it out on this video…


Perhaps you’re thinking that you don’t have anywhere to wear this – but let’s break it down.  Wear the earrings and brooch to work, add in the necklet for dinner out.  And for special occasions, clip it all together for an amazing statement necklace!  Fashion and function, you can’t go wrong.

For pricing and additional details, call me at 800.747.7552.  

Just ask for the Joden Girl.

Written by Carrie Martin

Photos and video by Shelly Isacco

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Joe’s Special Box – Volume 11

Joden Girl

Baubles, Bling, and A Collector’s Things

When I found this delicate beauty in Joe’s Special Box, I loved it immediately.   Then I saw the price – $1380.00.  While it certainly isn’t the most expensive ring we have, still – I was a bit surprised.  It’s lovely and positively screams quality, however, it seemed a bit high for such a little thing.  I asked Joe about it, and his response was simple…  “Because it’s absolutely beautiful.”

Anyone can see that he’s right.  The ring sits perfectly on the finger with a navette-shaped onyx center accented by three natural pearls and fourteen rose cut diamonds.  I didn’t realize how special the ring was until we started to really study it.  With his loupe in hand, Joe described how the shank of the ring was made – only then did I understand the true beauty of the piece.

 

The main structure of this ring was painstakingly handcrafted from a singular piece of rosy 18 karat gold.  To form the triple-split shank, the artisan carefully drilled holes into the design, then used a fine jeweler’s saw to remove excess metal.  The photos above show just how precise the handiwork is.  Then an extremely time-consuming process called trumming began.  Strips of cloth that were coated in polishing compound were threaded into the sawn surfaces of the ring – these strips were moved back and forth, time after time until the gold was smooth and polished.  This technique would have taken countless hours.  Suddenly, $1380 seemed like a bargain.  Go to our site and look, surely you’ll agree.

Written by Carrie Martin

Photos by Shelly Isacco

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